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Browsing Law Faculty Scholarship by Author "Edgar, J. Hadley"

Browsing Law Faculty Scholarship by Author "Edgar, J. Hadley"

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  • Edgar, J. Hadley (St. Mary's Law Journal, 1976)
    The purpose of this article is to propose a middle ground – one between the traditional concept of no duty at all and the suggested duty of active aid and rescue. Let us simply impose a duty upon the bystander to sound ...
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (Texas Law Review, 1956)
    Professor Edgar, then a student, published his law review comment that analyzes the grand jury report, procedural devices to attack the report, and views of the grand jury report.
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (Texas Bar Journal, 1980)
    This article urges the Texas judiciary to reexamine and modify the existing law in the area of strict products liability. In Henderson v. Ford Motor Company, the Texas Supreme Court held that the aspect of plaintiff’s ...
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (St. Mary's Law journal, 1980)
    Policy considerations favoring settlement agreements have given rise to the body of law surrounding the judicial treatment accorded settlements. This article will examine certain considerations which should be given to ...
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (Texas Tech Law Review, 1979)
    Until recently, two major stumbling blocks precluded recovery by victims of unintended injuries caused by the use of defective products: proof of negligence or fault by and lack of privity of contract with the defendant. ...
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (Lexis-Nexis, 1987)
    Texas Torts and Remedies is a great resource to use as your starting point to research the elements of a particular tort. The first volume covers the basic principles and provides cross-references to other chapters that ...
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (LexisNexis, 1988)
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (1990)
    Professor Edgar gives a stirring tribute to his resigning friend and colleague, Professor Hal M. Bateman.
  • Edgar, J. Hadley (Southwestern Law Journal, 1972)
    Until a few years ago, many Texas lawyers erroneously believed that a “slip and fall” case was relatively easy to prepare and try. If the defendant knew of the dangerous condition on the floor or it had been there so long ...