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Browsing Law Faculty Scholarship by Author "Soonpaa, Nancy"

Browsing Law Faculty Scholarship by Author "Soonpaa, Nancy"

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  • Soonpaa, Nancy (The Second Draft, 2000)
    Professor Soonpaa details how she teaches law students to write office memoranda through examples, sample questions, paradigms, and exercises.
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (The Second Draft, 1995)
    Professor Soonpaa acknowledges that IRAC is useful, even effective, for taking law school exams, but emphasizes that experienced legal writers should use IRAC more as a guideline rather than a hard-lined rule as 1L’s do.
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (Texas Tech Law Review, 2003)
    In the 2001-2002 term, the Fifth Circuit considered and decided thirty four cases related to civil rights issues. This article serves to survey and summarize those cases. Its purpose is not to critique those cases; rather, ...
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (The Second Draft, 2001)
    Professor Soonpaa explains five exercises that aid students in better grasping the art of writing persuasively.
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (The Second Draft, 1999)
    Professor Soonpaa discusses the different ways she comments on students’ written work depending upon the particular student-professor interaction.
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (2006)
    Establishes the parameters and common features that define successful programs for teaching legal writing skills in law school and to help improve the quality of legal writing programs across the country.
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (Connecticut Law Review, 2004)
    This article starts from the premise that stress is not inherently bad, but that heightened levels of it in a definable population should lead to further inquiry. That further inquiry could reveal the specific stressors ...
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (Journal of the Legal Writing Institute, 1997)
    Showing how scholarly work is useful in teaching new law students.
  • Soonpaa, Nancy (The Second Draft, 1997)
    Professor Soonpaa recommends that law professors add variety to their teaching so they can reach students who learn material in different ways.