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Learning from Law's Past: A Call for Caution in Incorporating New Innovations in Neuroscience

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dc.contributor.author Bard, Jennifer S.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-31T18:07:30Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-31T18:07:30Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation 7(9) Am. J. Bioethics 73 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10601/289
dc.description.abstract Under the umbrella of the burgeoning neurotransdisciplines, scholars are using the principles and research methodologies of their primary and secondary fields to examine developments in neuroimaging, neuromodulation and psychopharmacology. The path for advanced scholarship at the intersection of law and neuroscience may clear if work across the disciplines is collected and reviewed and outstanding and debated issues are identified and clarified. In this article, I organize, examine and refine a narrow class of the burgeoning neurotransdiscipline scholarship; that is, scholarship at the interface of law and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Journal of Bioethics
dc.subject Technology
dc.subject Reliability
dc.subject Eyewitness testimony
dc.subject Polygraph
dc.subject DNA analysis
dc.subject Handwriting analysis
dc.subject Neuroimaging
dc.title Learning from Law's Past: A Call for Caution in Incorporating New Innovations in Neuroscience en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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