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Foreign Affairs Crises and the Constitution's Case or Controversy Limitation: Notes from the Founding Era

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dc.contributor.author Casto, William R.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-09T16:23:10Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-09T16:23:10Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation 46 Am. J. Legal Hist. 237 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10601/468
dc.description.abstract In theory the federal courts might play a significant role in formulating foreign policy and in resolving disputes related to foreign policy, but from the earliest days of the Republic, they seldom have. Instead federal judges have always played a comparatively minor role in the arena of foreign policy. This essay examines two high-profile foreign policy cases that the Federal District Court in Philadelphia adjudicated some two hundred years ago. The resolution of these two cases teaches enduring lessons about the federal courts' structural ability to render timely and useful legal advice related to controversial foreign affairs issues. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.uri http://www.heinonline.org/HOL/Page?handle=hein.journals/amhist46&id=247&collection=journals&index=journals/amhist
dc.relation.uri http://web2.westlaw.com/find/default.wl?rs=WLW9.10&ifm=NotSet&fn=_top&sv=Split&findjuris=00001&cite=46+Am.+J.+Legal+Hist.+237&vr=2.0&rp=%2ffind%2fdefault.wl&mt=Westlaw
dc.subject federal courts en_US
dc.subject foreign policy en_US
dc.title Foreign Affairs Crises and the Constitution's Case or Controversy Limitation: Notes from the Founding Era en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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